Post Foods ‘A+’ in Scamming Consumers

7 Comments

  1. Stuart M.

    I’ve said it before. I live outside the USA and don’t have ready access to my favorite cereal Post Grape Nuts. On a recent trip, I noticed with dismay the “Non-GMO Project” label when I was reaching for the box at the grocery store. I put that box back and took the generic brand version instead. Then I fired off an angry email to Post.

  2. Billy

    I really appreciate you looking out for us people but I do have to add this… Even though there’s no GMO wheat available on the market, consumers don’t know that.

    So putting a non gmo label on a product that can’t be gmo is still valuable because it still informs them of that truth. I agree they should not be deceptive about it. They should say “Non gmo verified, wheat is always non gmo” to actually inform customers further.

    What makes me mad is seeing non gmo project verified on products that blatantly state “modified corn starch” on the ingredients list. That’s just plain wrong. Non gmo project is a SCAM.

  3. If the Non-GMO Project only verified products that are at high risk of being GMOs, it would place an undue burden on consumers. Most people don’t have an exhaustive knowledge of which ingredients are likely to come from GMOs and we want to make it easy for people to identify non-GMO options.

    There is also more than wheat in most breakfast cereals. This article neglected to mention that Grape Nuts also contain malt extract and yeast, both of which can be products of genetic engineering. Grape Nuts also contained multiple other GMO risk ingredients before changing the formula to remove potential GMOs. That’s a lot to keep track of! Consumers deserve an informed choice without needing to memorize constantly-changing ingredient lists and new developments in the commercial availability of GMO ingredients.

    Learn more about why the Non-GMO Project verifies seemingly low-risk products:

    https://livingnongmo.org/2016/12/22/why-the-non-gmo-project-verifies-low-risk-ingredients/

    1. SAIFood

      First, thank you for your comments! SAIFood understands that you are defending your business and that the Non-GMO Project is providing a service you believe is missing from the market. However, we would like to address a few things from your comment.

      SAIFood did not fail to mention Grape Nut cereal, our blog is about Shredded Wheat and a photo clearly indicates that ingredient label showing 100% is wheat. The Grape Nut reference was a posted comment, not from us.

      While we cannot expect consumers to know every technical detail about food production, we don’t think its right to use a non-GMO label for foods that have not been modified and bear no risk. In Canada, the CFIA and Health Canada assess all food products for risks, and determine what products are safe for consumers and to only approve those products found to be safe. We at SAIFood are more comforted by having PhD scientists assessing our food products for safety rather than a labelling initiative.

  4. Hi Billy,

    The “modified” in modified corn starch does not stand for genetically modified. In this context, “modified” simply means that the corn starch has been changed or altered in some way. This could mean:

    -Roasting the starch

    -Treating the starch with an acid

    -Using an electrical charge on the starch

    -Treating the starch with sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide

    You can be sure products bearing the Non-GMO Project verification mark are in compliance with our rigorous Standard, which includes testing of high-risk products such as corn.

    Learn more about modified starches:
    https://livingnongmo.org/2017/10/01/faq-what-is-the-modified-in-modified-corn-starch/

  5. Emily

    You raise a great point. I’m wondering, too, whether just because wheat isn’t genetically modified, there exists the chance that it contains traces of herbicides and pesticides. I wonder if these big food companies can start verifying the effect their farming has on biodiversity and soil health. All things to consider 🙂

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